1990s Menghai Green Label Raw Pu’erh via Varat [Episode 243]

This episode, Denny and James drink a sample generously provided by Varat. This one was stored moderately wet and is now smooth, woody, creamy, and very tasty.

http://theguidetopuerhtea.blogspot.com/2017/10/educational-series-20-year-old-puerh.html

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4 Responses to 1990s Menghai Green Label Raw Pu’erh via Varat [Episode 243]

  1. Happy New Year to both of you, James and Denny. I like the setup. Heat (boiling) and good water are vital towards getting a good brew. It’s good to listen to both your impressions and see your reactions to the progression of the steeps. The middle and latter steeps are definitely the best as you found out.

    I think the dark color can be confusing in giving the impression that the tea must be very strong (flavor wise) and you hold off really allowing the tea to steep sufficiently. In my opinion I don’t think flash infusion allows the tea to impart enough flavor and texture into the brew to bring out the tea’s potential. I would suggest try adding another 3 or even 5 seconds to what you are already doing. That extra steeping time will allow the flavors and texture to really develop in the brew. Obviously you don’t want to overdo it but there is certainly a sweet spot to be found.

    When it comes to appreciating wet stored puerh you have to embrace the darkness. This category of tea is all about being soothing, grounded and stable. The profile is heavy and substantial as opposed to young green tea which tends towards being light and airy. On a personal level I find this category of tea rewarding but it takes time to fully appreciate all that’s going on. Experience can really help put in place the nuances and subtleties in puerh tea under this form of traditional storage.

    All the best, 2018 and going strong Teadb!

    • Jonny 山内 says:

      I find with Fu brick tea flash brewing technique similiarly doesn’t deliver the complexity of the tea neither does it allow the tea to open up sufficiently between steeps. I guess its a learning curve and each tea requires patience in getting the best out if it.
      In defence of flash brewing however it does appear to seperate different flavour nuances and layers and whilst it may lead to very different experiences between steeps it is a good way of building up an overall profile of a tea as each component is teased out and more discernible.

      • All good points. It comes down to the ultimate goal of the drinker. There’s individual preferences in terms of preferring a light or strong brew, and then there is brewing for study or enjoyment of the tea.

        I think for most people including me 90% of the time we want the best cup that a tea can offer us. So I share my experience and preference for enjoying the tea and getting what I perceive to be the best cup of tea.

        • James says:

          Jonny and Varat, thanks for chiming in. I appreciate the input on the brewing and will relay it to Denny. We will go a bit harder next time, this tea could easily handle it.

          Also thank you Varat for the tea and wishing you a great 2018!

          Cheers,
          -James

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